Welcome

My drug of choice is writing--writing, art, reading, inspiration, books, creativity, process, craft, blogging, grammar, linguistics, and did I mention writing?

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Best Dystopia [Diverse] (Nominations Needed)

What is the best (worst?) dystopia (not written by a cishet white man)?

This poll is from our Year of Diverse Polls, and as such it can't includes authors who are cishet white men. Please adjust your nominations accordingly.

The world is in ruins. Or maybe it's not in ruins but there's just something a little off. Or maybe it's perfect, but the price is the torturous misery of a single innocent child. Or maybe there's some ham handed analog for racism that's going on between the white kids' strange methods of dividing themselves up by SAT vocabulary words. In any case it's a dystopia, and it is doing its literary work to hold up a twisted mirror to our own society.

The Rules:

1- As always, I leave the niggling to your best judgement because I'd rather be inclusive. If you feel like J.K. Rowling writes dystopia, I'm not going to argue. (Though you might need to "show your work" to get anyone to second your nomination.) If you think Pern is a dystopia, nominate it. I won't be enforcing any rules about it being future Earth or anything.

2- Since dystopias are a setting, they can be for a single book, a series, or several series.

3- You may nominate two (2) dystopias. Two is the number of nominations. Neither one nor three shall ye nominate. And four is right out. I will NOT take any dystopias beyond the second that you suggest. (I will consider a long list to be "seconds" if someone else nominates them as well.)

3- You may (and should) second as many nominations of others as you wish. So stop back in and see if anyone has put up something you want to see go onto the poll.

4- Please put your nominations here. I will take dystopias nominated only as comments on this post. (No comments on FB posts or G+.)

5- You are nominating WRITTEN DYSTOPIAS, not their movie portrayals. CGI is making the Insurgent movies pretty fun to look at, but if you find the books to be a little contrived, you shouldn't nominate them.

6- No more endless elimination rounds. I will take somewhere between 8-20 best performing titles and at MOST run a single semifinal round. So second the titles you want even if they already have one. (Yes, I guess that would make them thirds, fourths, etc...)

69 comments:

  1. The Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Big Bah-Ha by C.S.E. Cooney
    Archivist Wasp by Nicole Kornher-Stace

    ReplyDelete
  3. The Broken Earth Trilogy by N K Jemisin
    The Book of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor

    ReplyDelete
  4. Who Fears Death by N. Okorafor fits here too.
    The Giver by Lois Lowry

    It's just non-cishet white man, right? So any variation of any one qualifier fits?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Best - Octavia Butler - Xenogenises series

    ReplyDelete
  6. The Lion of Senet, Jennifer Fallon
    The Medair Duoligy, Andrea K Host

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fallon rocks, great choice. I second.

      Delete
  7. Earthseed series (Parable of the Sower) by Octavia E. Butler

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oryx and Crake (just the first book of the trilogy tho)

    ReplyDelete
  9. The People of Sand and Slag by Paolo Bacigalupi

    Winter of Fire by Sheryl Jordan

    ReplyDelete
  10. Never Let Me Go - K Ishiguro
    The Handmaid's Tale - M Atwood

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oryx & Crake - Margaret Atwood
    Lagoon - Nnedi Okorafor

    ReplyDelete
  12. Obernewtyn by Isobelle Carmody

    The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

    ReplyDelete
  13. The Newsflesh universe by Mira Grant.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  15. 1Q84 - Haruki Murakami
    Handmaid’s tale - Margaret Atwood

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Second both 1q4 and handmaid's (likely redundant at this point, but..)

      Delete
  16. How about Don't Bite the Sun/Drinking Sapphire Wine by Tanith Lee as one dystopia. I wanna think some more on a second one.

    ReplyDelete
  17. The Six Duchies of Robin Hobb’s Farseer Trilogy are, I think, grim enough to qualify for this. (They’re also one of my favorite settings in spec fiction.) Also, Cixin Liu’s Three-Body Problem series.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The Scorpion Rules by Erin Bow
    The Handmaids tale by Margaret Atwood

    ReplyDelete
  19. All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders
    Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't in good conscience second All The Birds in the Sky, but I did want to give you points for recognizing that it's dystopian.

      Delete
    2. Scrolled until I found Station Eleven. Seconded.

      Delete
  20. Lord of the Flies- William Golding

    Never Let Me Go- Kazuo Ishiguro

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Was Golding LGBTQ+? White and male. Unless he was LGBTQ+, doesn't count.

      Delete
    2. Didn't make it regardless. Poll is already up

      Delete
  21. The Fifth Sacred thing - Starhawk

    ReplyDelete
  22. The Testament of Jessie Lamb, By Jane Rogers
    Only Ever Yours, by Louise O'Neill

    ReplyDelete
  23. I'll add to all the seconds for Broken Earth and Handmaid's Tale.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Battle Royale by Koushun Takami. Both the novel and the manga were incredible.

    ReplyDelete
  25. The Last One by Alexandra Oliva.
    Newsflesh series by Mira Grant.

    ReplyDelete
  26. The Fifth Sacred Thing Starhawk
    Oryx and Crake Margaret Atwood

    ReplyDelete
  27. Nominations:
    1. Invitation to the Game by Monica Hughes

    2. The Hunger Games trilogy

    ReplyDelete
  28. Unwind, by Neal Shusterman
    Divergent (the series, not just the first book. The way that Divergent directly challenges and complicates the ubiquitous and troubling pattern in dystopian YA of acting as though a much higher average standard of living isn't worth the tradeoff of not being able to choose your own job doesn't really become clear until the second book, and it's got the most functional model of resistance of any of the popular ones).

    ReplyDelete
  29. Oryx and Crake - Margaret Atwood
    Facing the Storm -Jennifer Brooks
    Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins

    ReplyDelete
  30. The city of ember - Jeanne duPrau

    ReplyDelete
  31. The Holdfast Chronicles by Suzy McKee Charnas - a truly disturbing set of books.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Peace fire by Amber Bird.

    Near future dystopian featuring wearables and shifty corporations.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Memoirs of a Survivor - Doris Lessing

    ReplyDelete
  34. "The Broken Earth Trilogy" by N K Jemisin
    And "The Sudden Appearance of Hope" by Claire North

    ReplyDelete